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RAVEL

DURING

1062

The Years 1787, 1488 and 1789,

ASONS Lib

Undertaken more particularly with a View of ascertaining the
CULTIVATION, WEALTH, RESOURCES, AND

NATIONAL PROSPERITY,

OF THE

KINGDOM OF FRANCE,

By ARTHUR YOUNG, Esq. F. R. S.

Honorary Member of the Societies of DUBLIN, BATH, YORK, SALFORD
and ODINAM; the Philofophical and Literary Society of MANCHES
TER; the Veterinary College of LONDON; the Oeconomical So-
ciety of BERNE; the Phyfical Society of ZURICH; the
Palatine Academy of Agriculture at MANHEIM; the Im-
perial Oeconomical Society established at PETERS-
BURGH; Affociate of the Royal Society at PA-

RIS; and Correfponding Member of the

Royal Academy of Agriculture at
FLORENCE; and of the Patrio-

tic Society at MILAN.

IN TWO VOLUMES

VOL. II.

LIBRA

niversity

MICHIS

DUBLIN:

PRINTED FOR MESSRS. R. CROSS, P. WOGAN, L. WHITE,
P. BYRNE, A. GRUEBER, J. MOORE, J. JONES,

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DC 25 .868

v.2

TRAVELS, &c.

PART SE CON D.

TH

CHA P. I.

Of the Extent of France,

HE circumstances which are most apt to command the attention of mankind, for giving importance to a country, are really valuable no farther than as they contribute to the cafe and profperity of the inhabitants. Thus the extent of a kingdom is of no other confequence than affording nourishment for a people too numerous to be reasonably apprehenfive of foreign conqueft. When a territory is much more confiderable than for this purpofe, it tends to infpire ambitious projects in VOL. II.

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the minds of the men that govern, which have proved, perhaps, more difaftrous than the deficiency of power that endangers the national defence. France, under Lewis XIV. was a remarkable inftance of this fact. The fituation to which the ambition of that prince had reduced her immenfe territory, was hardly preferable to that of Holland, in 1672, whose misfortunes flowed from the fame origin. Of the two extremes, France has undoubtedly more to apprehend from the ambition of her own rulers, than from that of any neighbour. Authorities vary confiderably in describing the extent of this fine kingdom. The Maréchal de Vauban makes it 30,000 leagues, or 140,940,000 arpents; Voltaire 130,000,000 arpents.—The accuracy of round numbers is always to be doubted. Templeman gives it an extent of 138,837 fquare geographic miles, of fixty to a degree; a measurement, which renders all his tables abfolutely uselefs for any purpose, but that of comparing one country with another, a degree being fixty-nine miles and an half, which makes it 119,220,8748%2 acres.-Paucton reduces his measure to French arpents, and makes the number 107,690,000. The Encyclopædia, article France, affigns 100,000,000 of arpents as the contents; and obferves, that, by Caffini's maps, the amount is 125,000,000. A late author calculates it at 105,000,000: and another at 135,600,000. None of these accounts feem fufficiently accurate for the purpose of giving

*L'Impot Abonné. 4to. 1789.

† Apologie fur l'edict de Nantes.

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a correct idea. The authority on which I am inclined most to rely is that of M. Necker, who calculates it (without Corfica) at 26,951 leagues fquare, of 22823 toises; this, I find amounts to 156,024,213 arpents of Paris, or 131,722,295 Englifh acres. Paucton, by covering his map with fhot to every indenture of outline, with the greateft care, found the kingdom to contain 103,021,840 arpents, each of 100 perch, at 22 feet the perch, or 1344 toifes fquare to the arpent; instead of which, the arpent of Paris contains but 900 toifes :--this measurement makes 81,687,016 English acres *.— Notwithstanding the credit ufually given to this writer for his accuracy, I must here reject his autho rity in favour of that of M. Necker. Paucton's calculation, which gives 81,687,016 English acres to France, affigns by the fame rule to England 24,476,315 † ; yet Templeman's furvey, at 60 miles to a degree, and therefore confeffedly below the truth, makes it 31,648,000, which at 69 to a degree, are 42,463,2641;; a greater difference than is found between them in eftimating the furface of France, which, by Paucton, is made 81,687,016 English acres, with a general admiffion of about a million more; and by Templeman, 88,855,680; or at 69, is 119,220,87483.

† Oeuvres 4to. p. 326.

I made this reduction, by valuing, with Paucton, the French arpent at 1,0000, and the English 0,7929.

That is 30,869,360 arpents royale, of 22 feet to the perch

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