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cholera and other patients. Many dead were turned out every twentyfour hours. The myrmidons of these pestilential receptacles were, moreover, almost as unceremonious with the miserable sick as with the dead. Because the poor wretches could not be bathed inside the hospital, these carriers of the dead, under the merciful superintendence of the native doctor, hauled them to the doors, and then literally tumbled them out; and having poured cold water over them, dragged them in again, with equal tenderness. I SAW THESE SCENES TRANSACTED.

The various Golgothas were thickly charged with dead. I came unintentionally almost, into the midst of one of these; and, while holding my breath, counted between forty and fifty bodies, besides many skeletons which had been picked by vultures. These birds were sitting in numbers on the neighbouring sandhills and tree, holding carniverous festivity on the dead, and the wild dogs lounged about, fúll of the flesh of man.

But the streets and lanes of the town, as well as the main road, presented many scenes of the most appalling misery and humiliation. The care of the magistrate, in having the dead removed, was commendable ; for the dead of the morning were not to be found in the evening, though, alas ! others had taken their places. Such misery as is here described might be seen all over the town, though more prevalent about the temple.

When the idol appeared in his car, many who were sick, attempted, with the hale pilgrims, to make their way out of the town toward their homes; some on foot, some in doolies ; * and some in hackeries.f Those on foot dropped on the road; and were to be seen about the sides of the tanks, and under the trees at the entrance of the town of Cuttack. Five or six were lying almost close to the policestation; but the jamadar (superintendant), and his assistants, were very comfortably eating their paun I

upon dry and comfortable mats. A little remonstrance, however, roused them to the assistance of the poor wretches. One of the sufferers, whom they were made to rescue, was a Bengalee Female, about middle age; who, sensible of the uncleanness her disease had produced, and feeling a burning thirst, had crawled by little and little to the edge of a pucka (brick) tank : she had descended step by step into the water, till only her head appeared above its surface, and, leaning against the steps, was fast sinking, and must soon have been drowned.

But it would be almost endless to detail individual instances of suffering and death : the above will be sufficient, as a specimen. The state of the miserable creatures on the road was, if possible, worse than in the city. Attacked by the cholera, they soon dropped into the rear of their company, and remained alone and unknown among thousands. Some sat down on the road, from which their rapidly increasing weakness rendered them unable to rise. This situation became their resting-place and their dying bed, as well as all the grave that many of them had. Others laid themselves on thegrass beside the road near tanks or jeels *, to which they crept to drink; and I suspect many perished from inability to ascend from these watering-places. Every night produced numbers of dead at the various resting-places, to be cast into the Golgotha next morning.

I passed through Piplee, one of the principal intermediate places between Cuttack and Pooree ; and, seeing the exposure endured by the pilgrims, ceased to wonder at the mortality. The people, worn out by their journey, without shelter, and exposed to the heavy pelting rain, laid themselves in rows by the road side. Here thousands lay, soaked with rain, till their garments were beaten into and mixed with the earth. Who could wonder if these should be seized with cholera? But I am sure I have said enough to convey some idea of the mortality of Juggernaut's pilgrims of 1841.

* Litters covered with canvass. + The common car of India.

1 The nut of the areca-palm, lime, and spice, wrapped in a betel-leaf, and chewed by the natives.

* A Jeel is a shallow lake or morass.

PARIS.

BRITISH AND FOREIGN BIBLE SOCIETY.

who caused the light to shine out of

darkness has been mercifully pleased I have already had occasion, over to accomplish the work of grace and and over again, to show, that if it be regeneration in his heart. The neightrue, according to the special object bours soon took notice of the alteraof your Society, that your colporteurs tion : he was rallied-he was persedare not appear as controversialists, cuted. The priests took up the mator even as evangelists, in the pe ter: his business was ruined; and culiar sense of that term, they are, he himself, with his wife, and five nevertheless, good and faithful dis small children, were plunged into ciples of Jesus Christ : who, without misery. But, notwithstanding all entering into learned explanations of this, he remains immoveable; and the truths essential to salvation, yet so far from murmuring, rejoices in speak of them from conviction and having found the “Pearl of great with unction, and thereby win souls price,” the treasure of which no one for Him, whose sacred word they can deprive him. are commissioned to disseminate. Thanks to the Lord ! instances of The following are instances, taken this description are becoming more from some of the most recent com and more frequent; and I know, for munications of your agents :

certain, that more than one religious “Cast thy bread upon the waters; awakening has been manifested in for thou shalt find it after many various places in France, immedidays,” is a quotation from the Book ately after the visit of a colporteur. of Ecclesiastes; the force of which encouraging truth is amply substan

BRUSSELS. tiated by one of our colporteurs. About three years ago, the friend in I am happy to say that our sales question visited a hamlet near Char- last month have improved a little, tres; and offered the Bible for sale, amounting to 87 Bibles, and 609 from house to house. The most Testaments, together with three whom he accosted insolently refused Books of Psalms, 699 volumes. Last it; while a few consented, after his week, three of our colporteurs in the pressing invitations, to take a copy. neighbourhood of L-sold exceedAmong the latter was a shoemaker, ingly well; one selling three Bibles who seemed to pay greater attention and thirty-three Testaments; another than the rest to the colporteur's one Bible and forty-nine Testaments; observations; apart from this, he had and a third four Bibles and sixty-one every reason to think that his visit Testaments. So you see, when we to the hamlet would be attended with are ready to faint, the Lord gives little fruit. It happened that in us a strengthening draught. It is August last he revisited the place; sometimes curious to hear the good and judge of his delight, when, on folks here talk about us and our ware. entering the shoemaker's shop, he You know that a bazaar having been seized him by the hand with warmth; opened at Brussels, I took a counter and told him at once, that, immedi there, and placed one of my best men ately after he had purchased a Bible at it, and he has sold very well of him (having had his attention indeed. A day or two ago I was drawn, by what he said, to the im standing at the counter, and a woman portance of its contents) he fell to came up to buy a Testament. She reading it—that he took a greater was very careful in asking whether interest every day in the perusal- or not it was a good one. I told her, that passages, which at first he had that most certainly it was that all of found obscure, were soon cleared up them were good. No,' she replied, to his mind by others, and that the Testaments which are sold here while learning to see himself a sin about the streets are falsified : I ner under condemnation, he had at would not look in one of them for the same time been enabled to look the world. I have seen the man that upon himself as pardoned, justified, sells them, but I would not buy one and saved by Jesus Christ. Thus on any account. Yes, if I had money enlightened, without any human enough to buy the whole he carries assistance, this worthy man became with him, I would do so, in order to changed in his demeanour; and He burn them.' I of course tried to convince her of her error, but I had little success : still, she bought one of the Diamond edition. A friend had bought one at the Bazaar, and had called at her house and read it for two hours to herself and husband : they were delighted with it. The friend said he could not leave his copy with them, because he was going to travel, and he wished to take it with him to read on the road. He told them, that at the bazaar she could get a similar one for seventyfive centimes. Her husband sent her to buy one. Our conversation was long and interesting. When I explained to her the nature of our work, the extent of our distributions, translations, and expenditure, she was amazed; and said, that if our work was a good one, we should receive an immense recompense; but

if it were a bad one, our condemnation would be most terrible ; for our work, if bad, was sufficient to poison all the religion of Europe ! She promised to return again. This conversation has given me fresh con

viction on a subject that I have had before me for a long while. I think we want something to answer the question now pretty generally put, « Well, but what is the Bible Society? what is its object?I have for a long while had a wish to get the Brief View translated into French, for general gratuitous distribution. Will you allow me to get it done? I am often obliged to give an English one to those who can but badly understand it. I think it would do us much good. I found the want of it greatly at Mons, at the issue of our Bible Meetings.

The following day we held our Meeting at Paturages, in the Protestant Church: it was crowded. Although the Meeting at Dour was so good, yet at Paturages we breathed a different air. You are aware that the church of Paturages is composed of converted Catholics : you will readily believe, then, that they are intensely interested in the cause of the Bible and the Bible Society.

SCHEDULE OF THE BENEFICES

TO BE AUGMENTED BY THE ECCLESIASTICAL COMMISSIONERS AGREEABLY TO

THE SCHEME PRESENTED TO HER MAJESTY IN COUNCIL, BEARING DATE THE FIFTH DAY OF Oct. 1841. .

Name of Benefice.

Quality.

Diocese.

County.

Annual payment

to each Benefice

24

Abergwilly ,

Vicarage

St. David's Carmarthen All Saints, Canterburym

Rectory

Canterbury Kent All Saints, Islington - - District Ch. London

Middlesex Alverthorpe

Perpet. Cur. Ripon un York Atherstone w

Perpet. Cur. Worcester Warwick Bedwelty

Perpet. Cur. | Llandaff - Monmouth
Bilton, with High Harrowgate . Perpet. Cur. Ripon - -

York
Bradshaw
Perpet. Cur. Chester w

Lancaster
Brixham (Lower) .
Perpet. Cur. | Exeter

Devon
Cam an - w

Vicarage Gloucester & Br. Gloucester
Chipping Norton
ton,

Vicarage
Oxford m

Oxford
Battyeford, Mirfield m District Ch. Ripon w w

York
Christ Church, Hoxton m. District Ch. London. Middlesex
Christ Church, Warminster Perpet. Cur. / Salisbury

Wilts
Churchstow, with Kingsbridge Vicarage | Exeteran ml Devon
Clapham
Vicarage Ripon

York
Coleford

Perpet. Cur. Gloucester & Br. Gloucester
Perpet. Cur. Ripon

York
Dalton

Vicarage
Chester

Lancaster
Deddington

Vicarage
Oxford

Oxford
Dunstable

Rectory Ely in Bedford Ellell

Perpet. Cur. Chester in Lancaster Emmanuel, Bolton

District Ch. | Chester in

Lancaster Ettingshalla

Perpet. Cur. Lichfield

Stafford Goodshaw wr

Perpet. Cur. Chester in Lancaster Gorton

an | Perpet. Cur. | Chester na Lancaster.

Coley

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Name of Benefice.

Quality.

Diocese.

County.

Annual payment to each Benefice

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1

Guisborough

Perpet. Cur. | York m York Harwood (Great)

Perpet. Cur. | Chesterm Lancaster
Hawkshead a

Perpet. Cur. Chesterm Lancaster
Heanor
Vicarage Lichfield

Derby
Heapey

Perpet. Cur.
Chester

Lancaster
Heptonstall

Perpet. Cur.
Ripon w w

York
Hollinwood - -

Perpet. Cur. Chester - Chester Holmfirth

Perpet. Cur. | Ripon a wa York
Holy Trinity, Bitton

Perpet. Cur. | Gloucester & Br. Gloucester
Horton
Perpet. Cur. Ripon

York
Hurst
Perpet. Cur.

Berks
Lenton

Vicarage
Lincoln

Nottingham
Llandyssul

Vicarage St. David's Cardigan Lansamlet

Perpet. Cur. St. David's Glamorgan
Lyth on

Vicarage | York - York
Marple
Perpet. Cur. Chester m

Chester
Marsden na
Perpet. Cur. Chester

Lancaster
Milnrow

Perpet. Cur. | Chesterm Lancaster Mossley

Perpet. Cur. Chesterm Lancaster Mynyddyslwyn

Perpet. Cur. | Llandaff

Monmouth Over or

Vicarage Chester

Chester Pateley

Perpet. Cur. | Ripon m York
Pemberton

Perpet Cur.
net Cur. | Chester

Lancaster
Pensher

Perpet. Cur. | Durhamm Durham
Pickering
Vicarage York

York
Prior's Lee
Perpet. Cur. Lichfield

Salop
Radnor (Old)

Vicarage
Hereford

Radnor
Royton
Perpet. Cur. Chester

Lancaster
Saddleworth
Perpet. Cur. | Chester

York
St. Ann, in the Grove
Perpet. Cur. Ripon

York
St. Augustine, Norwich

Rectory
Norwich

Norfolk
St. Clement, Worcester

Rectory
| Worcester

Worcester
St. Cuthbert, Carlisle
Perpet. Cur. Carlisle

Cumberland
St. Day, Gwennap -

Perpet. Cur. | Exeter

Cornwall
St. George, Barnsley
Perpet. Cur. Ripon

York
St. George, Shrewsbury
Perpet. Cur. | Lichfield

Salop.
St. Ives -
Perpet. Cur. Exeter

Cornwall
St. James, Enfield m
Perpet. Cur. London

Middlesex
St. James, Oldham .
Perpet. Cur. Chester

Lancaster
St. James, Thornes
District Ch. Ripon

York
St. James, South Stoneham District Ch.

Winchester

Hampshire St. John, Forton

District Ch. | Winchester Hampshire
St. John, Richmond

Perpet. Cur. / Winchester Surrey
St. Mary, Ely
Perpet. Cur. Ely

Cambridge
St. Mary Major, Exeter
Rectory Exeter

Devon
St. Nicholas, Rochester - Vicarage Rochester

Kent ddlestone

Perpet. Cur. / Winchester Surrey St. Paul'and St. James, Norwich Perpet. Cur. Norwich

Norfolk
St. Paul, Oxford -

Perpet. Cur. Oxford m Oxford
St. Paul, Warrington
Perpet. Cur. Chester

Lancaster
St. Thomas, Brampton
Perpet. Cur. Lichfield

Derby
St. Thomas, Friarmere

Perpet. Cur. Chester

Lancaster
St. Swithin, Lincoln

Perpet. Cur.
Lincoln

Lincoln
Samlesbury

Perpet. Cur. Chester

Lancaster Southbroom on

Perpet. Cur. Salisbury

Wiltshire
Stanley

Perpet. Cur.
t. Cur. | Ripon w

York
Strettord -

Perpet. Cur. Chesterm Lancaster Stowe, or St. Chad, Lichfield | Perpet, Cur. Lichfield

Stafford
Tockholesna

Lancaster
Perpet. Cur. ' Chester -
Trinity Col Com

Perpet. Cur. Carlislem | Cumberland
Tweedmouth

Perpet. Cur. | Durham

Durham
Whalley

Vicarage
Chester

Lancaster
Wigton or
Vicarage Carlisle

Cumberland
Wokingham -
| Perpet. Cur. Oxford

Berks Worsborough o | Perpet. Cur. | York

York

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THE CHRISTIAN GUARDIAN,

AND

DISTRICT VISITORS'

AND SUNDAY SCHOOL TEACHERS' MAGAZINE

IN CONNECTION WITH THE CHURCH OF ENGLAND.

FEBRUARY, 1842.

SHORT LECTURES ON THE COLLECTS.

FOR THE USE OF FAMILIES AND SUNDAY SCHOOLS.

FIFTH SUNDAY AFTER THE EPIPHANY.

In this Collect, the Church of God is spoken of as a household. This is a scriptural comparison ; and it very fitly describes the cireumstances of the church. For in it, believers of all countries and ages form one vast family; a family ever changing as it regards the persons composing it, but ever the same in character. This family has God for its Father : he is the Lord and Master of the house. The person through whom he dispenses his favours and bounties, is his own dear Son, the Mediator, Christ Jesus. And it is by the operation of the Holy Spirit that these favours actually are communicated to the hearts of believers. So far as God is concerned, every thing has been abundantly prepared in this house : nothing is wanting. His word invites us, and also instructs us how we are to enter into this family, and how we are to behave ourselves when received into it. His sacraments are designed visibly to admit us, and effectually to keep us within this family: so that all who “rightly receive” and faithfully use the sacraments, namely, Baptism and the Lord's Supper, will find the Lord of the household specially gracious to them. Is there then any thing yet remaining, which this happy family has to ask for?

There is : and the words of the Collect very distinctly teach us what it is : we pray that the Lord would continually keep us in his true religion ; a prayer very necessary, when we consider what are the many and real dangers of the church.

To understand what these perils are, refer to what St. Paul says in FEBRUARY, 1842.

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