Memoirs of the Queens of France, Volume 1

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Henry Colburn, 1843
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Page 341 - ADIEU, plaisant pays de France, O ma patrie La plus chérie, Qui as nourri ma jeune enfance ! Adieu, France, adieu mes beaux jours...
Page 100 - Christian shall consider him as his brother, or return him the salute of peace ; no priest shall pray for him, or permit him to approach the altar to receive divine grace. Friendship, and the consolation of hope shall not visit him when on his death-bed ; neither shall any beloved hand close his eyelids ; his entrails shall burst from his body ; his corpse shall remain unburied on the dismayed soil, and no pilgrim shall be suffered to throw a little earth upon his miserable remains ; his name shall...
Page 98 - Tours, who fave the nuptial benediction, condemned im to seven years of penitence, and placed the kingdom under an interdict until the king should dismiss Bertha. . . . The sentence of interdiction consisted in closing the churches, refusing the sacrament, and denying Christian burial to the dead ; the church bells ceased, the pictures in the sanctuaries were covered with black cloth, the statues of the saints were taken down, clothed in black, and placed on beds of cinders and thorns ; everything...
Page 169 - She was devotedly attached to him, and very much afraid of her mother-in-law — a feeling which doubtless influenced her determination to undertake the perilous journey with Saint Louis. Margaret bore up nobly under the disasters which befell the Christian host in Egypt : — " She was pregnant when the King was taken prisoner at Saint John d'Acre, in 1250, and was informed of this new catastrophe before her accouchement at Damietta, which place the King had confided to her government, and where...
Page 99 - ... from her infancy ; so that the bishops, in consenting to the marriage, were actuated by the love of their country, for which they anticipated great advantage from this union. " Although very devout, Robert was too much attached to his wife to yield to the will of the Pontiff. In the retired château of Vauvert, near Paris, the unfortunate pair braved the Roman curse, wandering together unattended through the groves and meadows, and admiring in the pure sky the image of a mild and beneficent Creator....
Page 74 - Amazon, intrepidly pursued the most ferocious beasts into the depths of the forest.' — vol. i. pp. 65, 66. If this means anything, it means that the charming Luitgarde figured by the side of Charlemagne in a riding-habit (en Amazone), according to the last fashion of the Bois de Boulogne. ' The Prince Charles was sent to the Abbey of Pruym in Prussia ; and Judith, after having her head shaved, was confined in the Abbey Tortona in Lombardy.
Page 306 - ... at royal cost. She was buried in Westminster Abbey in the vault of her son, Charles. CATHERINE DE' MEDICI (1519—1589) ANNIE FORBES BUSH GRAND NIECE of Leo X., and only daughter of Laurent de' Medici, Duc d'Urbin, and of Madeleine de la Tour d'Auvergne Lauraquais, Catherine de' Medici was born in Florence in 1519, and educated in the bosom of her family, who governed that country with much celebrity. On her marriage with the young Duke of Orleans, afterwards Henry II., in 1533, her uncle, Pope...
Page 332 - ... by the addition of the island of Sardinia. This ambitious woman also despatched a fleet in 1580 to maintain her pretensions to the Crown of Portugal, but in that enterprise she failed. The formation of the League in 1585 augmented her power, but threw France into the most terrible disorder; the Duc de Guise placed himself at the head of the revolt, and plunged the nation into an abyss of trouble, which the accession of Henry the Great alone put an end to. After the celebrated " day of barricades,"...
Page 320 - Chancellor de 1'Hopital, whose influence lasted too short a time for the welfare of his country. The Regent was not equally skilful in regard to the Protestants, who attacked her government, and published memoirs, in which she was accused of unlawfully taking part in the administration: the conspiracy of Amboise completely drew upon them the hatred of this arrogant Queen, although she was very indifferent to matters of religion, and at one time even affected an attachment for the Protestants, whose...
Page 100 - Vauvert were constantly filled by the unhappy people, who, on their knees, entreated Robert to restore them to the exercise of the religion they so much loved and so superstitiously practised. The good king was desirous of satisfying his desolate subjects, but when he gazed upon his affectionate wife, he rejected the idea of separation ; till at length Bertha, more courageous than the king, voluntarily resolved to submit to this generous sacrifice, which was to restore peace to the kingdom and dignity...

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